You Ought To Be In (20) Pictures

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Many years ago, using the weekly TV guide that came with the Sunday Chicago Tribune, I started keeping track of all of the movies I had seen over the course of my lifetime.  The guide would list the two main stars for each movie, and that is a tradition that I’ve carried on in my database ever since.  So, given those guidelines, and thanks to a corona virus inspired uptick to my movie watching this year, it is time to look at the 100 actors that have starred in at least 10 films that I have seen, as of July 1.

Today, we continue with the 4 actors that has starred in 21 movies that I have seen, an increase of three from 3 years ago.

Samuel L. Jackson

26 years ago, I first made the acquaintance of Samuel L. Jackson in 2 polar opposite films, Pulp Fiction and National Lampoon’s Loaded Weapon 1.  After 1994, I also saw 2 Jackson films in 2000, 2006, 2019, and 2020.  There was a 6 year break between Lakeview Terrace, which I saw in 2010, and Kingsman: The Secret Service, which I saw in 2016.  The last starring roles of Jackson’s I took in earlier this year were 2019’s Shaft and 2015’s Barely Lethal.

Scarlett Johansson

I was first introduced to Scarlett Johansson in 2001 when I saw the comic-book adaptation Ghost World.  Starting in 2004, there was a 6 year run where I saw 11 of the 14 films that make up this total, including 5 in 2006 alone.  Another 3 films came in 2014.  She is riding an active 3-year streak, with my most recent experience with her coming last year in Netflix’s Marriage Story.

Eddie Murphy

It’s hard to believe now, but at one time, Eddie Murphy was the biggest star in the land.  My first experience with him was likely Beverly Hills Cop.  7 of his films were seen before I started my database, so I can’t be entirely sure of when I first saw them.  Of the 7 years since that I have seen an Eddie Murphy film, 5 of them have been multiples.  After a 15 year absence, Eddie Murphy returned to my screen in 2019, when I finally took in 2003’s Haunted Mansion.

Julia Roberts

Julia Roberts burst on to the scene in 1990’s Pretty Woman, which was one of 2 films of hers I saw in 1991.  I’ve seen multiple films from her in 1991, 1994, 2000, and 2017, with her big year for me being 2000, when I saw 4 different films in which she starred.  My last Julia Roberts vehicles, 2016’s Money Monster and 2011’s Larry Crowne, were seen in 2017.

Post Mortem – Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt

After 4 seasons on Netflix, Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt came to its second end in January with the release of the second half of season 4.  The show was originally developed at NBC, but was sold to Netflix after the network was “not feeling confident about watching comedies,” according to creator Tina Fey.

The show thrived on Netflix, making a star of Broadway actor Tituss Burgess.  In May 2019, it was reported the series would return with an interactive special set to premiere sometime in 2020.  I will be sure to tune in.

Post Mortem – Jessica Jones

On February 18, 2019, Netflix announced that they were cancelling Jessica Jones after 3 seasons. The move coincides with the ending of most of the Marvel shows produced for Netflix at a time when the studio’s parent company, Disney, is looking to launch their own streaming service.

Jessica Jones was the second of a burgeoning stable of Marvel shows on Netflix, following Daredevil. While technically set in the Marvel Cinematic Universe, the Netflix shows only tangentially referenced the events and the heroes of the movies, sometimes going to great lengths to avoid it.

New Marvel shows will be moving to Disney+ after it launches later this year and those are expected to be more closely tied to the MCU. Per the original deal between Marvel and Netflix for the series, the characters cannot appear in any non-Netflix series or films for at least two years following the show’s cancellation, so it may be awhile before the character shows back up in the MCU, if at all.

Post Mortem – The Punisher

On February 18, 2019, Netflix announced that they were cancelling The Punisher after 2 seasons.  The move coincides with the ending of most of the Marvel shows produced for Netflix at a time when the studio’s parent company, Disney, is looking to launch their own streaming service.

The Punisher was the last of a burgeoning stable of Marvel shows on Netflix, spun off from Daredevil after appearing in the second season of that show. While technically set in the Marvel Cinematic Universe, the Netflix shows only tangentially referenced the events and the heroes of the movies, sometimes going to great lengths to avoid it.

New Marvel shows will be moving to Disney+ after it launches later this year and those are expected to be more closely tied to the MCU. Per the original deal between Marvel and Netflix for the series, the characters cannot appear in any non-Netflix series or films for at least two years following the show’s cancellation, so it may be awhile before the character shows back up in the MCU, if at all.

Post Mortem – Luke Cage

On October 19, 2018, Netflix announced that they were cancelling Luke Cage after 2 seasons, claiming creative differences on the direction of season 3. The move coincides with the ending of most of the Marvel shows produced for Netflix at a time when the studio’s parent company, Disney, is looking to launch their own streaming service.

Luke Cage was the third of a burgeoning stable of Marvel shows on Netflix, following Daredevil and Jessica Jones. While technically set in the Marvel Cinematic Universe, the Netflix shows only tangentially referenced the events and the heroes of the movies, sometimes going to great lengths to avoid it.

New Marvel shows will be moving to Disney+ after it launches later this year and those are expected to be more closely tied to the MCU.  Per the original deal between Marvel and Netflix for the series, the characters cannot appear in any non-Netflix series or films for at least two years following the show’s cancellation, so it may be awhile before the character shows back up in the MCU, if at all.

Post Mortem – Daredevil

On November 29, 2018, Netflix announced that they were cancelling Daredevil after 3 seasons.  The move coincides with the ending of most of the Marvel shows produced for Netflix at a time when the studio’s parent company, Disney, is looking to launch their own streaming service.

Daredevil was the first of a burgeoning stable of Marvel shows on Netflix, leading the way for Jessica Jones, Luke Cage, Iron Fist, The Punisher, and The Defenders.  While technically set in the Marvel Cinematic Universe, the Netflix shows only tangentially referenced the events and the heroes of the movies, sometimes going to great lengths to avoid it.

New Marvel shows will be moving to Disney+ after it launches later this year and those are expected to be more closely tied to the MCU.  While it is technically possible for Daredevil to continue on that service, odds are against it.

Midseason Review – Mondays

old-tv-set1We continue our annual look back at the new fall season with Monday night’s offerings.

7:00

Arrow – Season 7 starts with Oliver Queen in jail after being outed as the Green Arrow.

Following the Lost approach of replacing flashbacks with flashforwards.  I imagine the end will be coming sooner rather than later.

The Neighborhood – Max Greenfield and Beth Behrs return as a white family who move into a black neighborhood in LA.

I made it through 2 or 3 episodes before deciding that I had better uses of my time.

8:00

DC’s Legends of Tomorrow – The Legends return for their 4th season, one I’m sure to enjoy once I go back and watch season 3.

Thanks to Netflix, I was able to catch up on season 3 and then stay current this season.  It has stopped taking itself seriously in any way, shape, or form, and the show is better off for it.

Book 19 (of 52) – Talking as Fast as I Can

Talking As Fast As I Can: From Gilmore Girls To Gilmore Girls (And Everything In Between) – Lauren Graham

With the Netflix revival of Gilmore Girls dropping on Thanksgiving in 2016, this memoir from series star Lauren Graham hit the streets the following week.  In it, she details some of her early life, her road to stardom, experiencing the hit that was Gilmore Girls, revisiting the series (and the character) 9 years later, and a smattering of Parenthood and its impacts on her personal life.

Graham has a breezy style that matches the comedy of the characters she has played over the years.  She provides an interesting look behind the scenes of one of my favorite shows and shares the same giddy anticipation at returning to Stars Hollow that viewers felt leading up to the release of the revival.

Post Mortem – Designated Survivor

When a terrorist attack during the State of the Union address destroys the government of the United States, an FBI agent tries to track down the perpetrators while the “designated survivor” tries to rebuild the government structure.  While this sounds like a pretty good season of 24, with Jack Bauer on the case, it made for a lackluster series where Kiefer Sutherland was stuck behind the desk as the new president.

On May 11, 2018, ABC canceled Designated Survivor after its second season, but it is expected to return for a third season on Netflix sometime next year.  I made it partway through the first season, where a missing episode made me stop.  Now that it is on Netflix, I may go back and revisit it, if I ever find the time.

Book 4 (of 52) – Bonfire

Bonfire – Krysten Ritter

Actress Krysten Ritter, star of the hit Netflix show Jessica Jones, set the literary world ablaze with Bonfire, her first novel.  In it, a lawyer returns to her hometown hoping to both prove that a local company is poisoning the water table and solve the disappearance of her one-time best friend after high school.  Along the way, she rekindles old relationships and, eventually, finds the answers she was looking for.

I was a bit surprised at how good this book was.  When a celebrity gives some other creative endeavor a try, it is easy to dismiss it as a vanity project.  That certainly was not the case here.  I don’t know if there is more in the works from Ritter, but I would certainly be interested in reading it should there be.